On the Threshold of Winter

 In most places around the country falling leaves signal the arrival of autumn.  Not so in Phoenix.  When leaves at the Seed finally cover the ground, we know we’re well on our way to winter.  Even though the winter solstice is still a week away, the leaf-covered ground is a sign that our balmy days . . . Read More


December Strong

 The other night at sunset, the looming darkness took me back to where I was a year ago.  Just a few weeks shy of our departure for India, I felt like I was at the edge of a great chasm, preparing to step completely into the unknown.  The month of December with the shortest days . . . Read More


Steeped in Gratitude

Preparations for our celebration of gratitude started last week as each class brainstormed ideas of what they could for another classroom.  In the K-1 class they began with the question:  What is it to be thankful?  Children said, “It’s when you love people.”  “It’s when you say thank you for all that people do for . . . Read More


Soup for the Bad Guys

The rain was a blessing for our dry desert.  It also transformed our playground into a mud bog that inspired all sorts of imaginative play.  It was a heyday for small persons in brightly colored rain boots.  On Wednesday I noticed a group of young sand chefs, madly stirring and pouring muddy water into a . . . Read More


You Can’t Say You Can’t Play

On Tuesday a boy approached me on the playground and said another child told him he couldn’t play with him.  He said, “That’s including.”  I clarified that what he was experiencing was actually called “excluding.”  Then I invited the child who was excluding to come over and talk.  The first child said, “I don’t like . . . Read More


K-4 at the Seed

 We want you to know about our exceptional K-4 program.  Although we’re just entering our fourth month of the school year, it will soon be time for making decisions about the future.  In order to help families make the most informed decision about elementary school placement, we are offering a K-4 information session on Wednesday, . . . Read More


A Story Line for Each Character

Since late August, I’ve worked with the 3rd/4th graders on their writing once a week.  At the suggestion of their teacher, we jumped into a form of writing that was new to me with this age group, development of a fictional character and creating a story around that character.  In the past, I generally stuck . . . Read More


Instead of Selling Candy

The Seed carnival started in the 1980s as an alternative to trick-or-treating.  It has evolved over the years into a huge community event, attended by current and alumni families, as well as neighbors and other local friends.  It’s become a much anticipated first return to the Seed after families leave to move on to other . . . Read More


Never Give Up

On my walk along the canal yesterday morning, pushing my great-granddaughter in her stroller, a man with his little dog called out to me:  “Good morning, Grandma.  Never give up!”  I replied, “I won’t.  I’ll keep going as long as I can.”  As I kept walking, his words lingered in my mind.  He pretty well . . . Read More


More Than A Nap

For the past fourteen years I’ve taught a kids yoga class at Desert Song Healing Arts Center on Tuesday afternoons.  I’ve worked with hundreds of children under the age of ten.  Some of them are in college now, and new students keep arriving.  Many of them attended my class for several years before outgrowing it . . . Read More


Taking A Break

For over thirty years, the Mystery Theater has been a part of the Seed’s annual Halloween carnival.  It began in the 1980s as a production put on by Seed staff to entertain carnival attendees.  Dozens of staff have participated in all phases of the production, including script writing, acting, choreography, set design, costumes, music management, . . . Read More


Color Study in Grey

Early Tuesday morning I sat in the dentist chair, looking out large windows into the overcast skies looming over the valley.  I noticed a heron perched on top of the building in front of me.  It was a color study in grey.  Monday was the autumn equinox, and our shifting weather matched the change of . . . Read More


A Grand Event

On Monday the Seed grandparents gathered once again.  Over twenty arrived for the beginning of our fourth year as an organized group.  During introductions we met grandparents new to the Seed and caught up with familiar friends who have been around the school for a long time (including one grandmother whose daughters are Seed graduates).  . . . Read More


Psychological Nutrients

The scent of basil is a sure sign that our nutrition study is  underway.  Coincidentally, as food nutrients dominated conversation in classrooms,  I came across a new term— psychological nutrients.  My ears and mind perked up, wondering what this idea could possibly mean.   It came to me in the same way I absorb most . . . Read More


Food Foundation

Healthy food has always been a priority at the Seed.  Over the years it’s taken on different expressions as we’ve responded to trends in nutrition.   Our current practices have been highly influenced by this article.    Another influence related to food is our dedication to planetary stewardship.  During the first few weeks of school, I . . . Read More


Simplicity and Presence

Morning walks this time of year always seem to reveal life lessons.  Whether it’s an unusually simple cloud formation or a homeless man balancing his found possessions precariously on a “borrowed” grocery cart, there’s always something that connects with what I’ve been thinking about.  Two words, simplicity and presence, have been swirling around in my . . . Read More


How We Talk to Children

In July we took my great-granddaughter to Minnesota to visit her great-great grandparents.  Included in the mix of family present was my great-niece, Emmy.  She’s a bright, articulate, curious girl, and was completely mesmerized by the baby.  Being a typical four-year-old, she wanted to touch her new little cousin and find out all she could . . . Read More


Red Threads

The red threads captured my attention.  During one of my summer morning walks, I heard an interview with Marcus Buckingham. He described his life long obsession with helping others improve the quality of their workplace experience.  The interview held my attention, yet there was nothing extraordinary in the conversation until he brought up the red threads. . . . Read More


Trimming the Duck’s Feet

I walked into the K-1 this just as a duck was having her feet trimmed.  In preparation for their upcoming production of Crocodile Beat by Gail Jorgensen, one of the ducks was with her teacher, having a costume fitting.  On the table behind them was a pile of handmade costumes and props, including a crocodile . . . Read More


Congruent with Who We Are

As this fourth week of summer camp comes to a close, the word “congruent” surfaces in my mind.  Congruent means to be in agreement or in harmony.  It comes from the Latin verb Congruere “to come together, correspond with.”   All week long I’ve seen evidence of congruency in action. When we developed our plan for . . . Read More


Let’s Keep Moving

Things are moving and shaking at the Seed this summer.  When we designed our program this year, we wanted to make sure there was a strong movement component.  The summer heat often brings on a tendency toward being lethargic, so we decided to take a proactive approach.  We have regularly scheduled music classes once a . . . Read More


One Step at a Time

Last Friday morning was a popular time for water play, so the sand circle was flooded more extensively than normal.   I had the pleasure of being on duty for lunch recess and got in on some excellent water play action.  One thing I noticed right away was several children attempting to cross over the . . . Read More


Seeds of Success

Our new edition of The Harvest, the Seed’s yearbook, just arrived this week.  It’s full of happy student faces, quotes, and photos of their lively art collected from projects throughout the year.  Usually we dedicate the yearbook to a staff member.  This year, at the request of Krina (our editor), the dedication is different.  It . . . Read More


Ripening

During playground duty I noticed our peach tree was loaded with fruit.  Its branches were heavy with ripening fuzzy peaches.  The birds had already discovered several and helped themselves to a sweet meal.  I picked a few that were starting to soften and handed them over to one of the teachers for her class to . . . Read More