Cracking Open Who You Are

What I’ve always loved about this time of year as a teacher is the opportunity to explore human rights issues with children.  Even though I haven’t been in the classroom for over ten years, I manage to keep my fingers in the pie, so to speak.  It’s one of the most organic parts of my . . . Read More


Growing into Goodness

Yesterday was another day of challenging news, and although I’ve vowed to give myself some space from all of the listening and reading, I’m having a hard time staying away from it.  I want to know what’s going on in the world.  I want to be informed so I can be a better teacher, leader, . . . Read More


Winding Down An Unusual Year

Under normal circumstances, this week would have been a high energy time around the Seed.  We’d be putting final touches on the dances each class was about to present on Thursday night in our Celebration of the Winter Solstice.  Dances would be unveiled on Wednesday morning at the dress rehearsal where we were all dazzled . . . Read More


Another Light Gone

Over the years I’ve often written of my third grade teacher who made such an impact on me as a young child.  As I grew older, there was another teacher, Jim Fraser.  He was my math teacher in junior high and high school.  As I read over some of the memories posted about him on . . . Read More


Approaching the Solstice

Last week we were out walking in the neighborhood one evening and passed a father and his daughter in the process of setting up their holiday lights.  We could tell they were a team.  We commented how beautiful their lights were, and the dad said, “She’s in charge.  It’s all her idea.”  It was clear . . . Read More


Be Safe, Be Well

Normally on this day we’d be hustling around, setting up tables, plugging in the warmer, and preparing for our all-school feast.  The building would be filled with unbelievably mouth watering smells, and aluminum containers would be lined up for the eventual food service lines.  Eventually families would start arriving, and after a large gathering in . . . Read More


The Problem with Thanksgiving

It’s a week before Thanksgiving, and we hit a record 92 degrees on Tuesday.  Hardly anything surprises me these days.  In addition to the unusual weather, it’s a time of profound change, both externally and internally.  Certain world events have triggered profound changes in myself, one of the most significant being the killing of George . . . Read More


Seasoned Warriors

Wednesday was Veterans Day.  I held my own personal celebration by calling my 95-year-old father, Jim Kenner.  He’s a veteran and continues to be involved in his local American Legion post.  In fact, he was the recipient of a 75-year continuous service pin in March, right before the pandemic hit.  We were able to be . . . Read More


In Light of These Times

The last sentence of my previous blog reads, “We are the Seed after all, and our work will always be to reach toward the light.”  I thought of this Wednesday morning with all the weight of uncertainly around the election, the growing number of COVID-19 cases on the planet, and the daily responsibility of making . . . Read More


Passing by Lovely Gardens

 A favorite part of my day is pickup between 3 and 3:20.  Over time, my task has become walking children from their classrooms on the south side of the building to their parents waiting at the gate.  It’s a time to connect with certain children I don’t normally see throughout the day.  Some students are . . . Read More


In Lieu of Halloween

 As the months keep adding up since the pandemic began, it’s easy to slide into the mindset of focusing on what we’ve lost.  I struggle with this daily, and all of it is making many of us feel incredibly tired.  Yet we press on, showing up every day to serve our students, support each other, and . . . Read More


Opening the Space

 Teal colored chairs and tables arrived around the same time as the students.  After many months of virtual learning, we opened the space for more of our elementary and preschool students to return to in-person schooling.  We were aware of the risks of adding more students to our classrooms, and it was time.  Keeping in . . . Read More


A Way to Survive

Over the years I’ve come to love this time of year when summer is (mostly) behind us and we shift our gaze toward autumn.  We’ve been in school almost two months, and it’s time for parent/teacher conferences.  After conferences we typically begin gearing up for our annual Halloween carnival.  COVID-19 has drastically changed everything, and . . . Read More


Time for A Plan

I don’t remember a time when using our voices has seemed so important.  There’s much to sort through as we move toward an election that will significantly alter the course of our country one way or another.  I have my personal opinions, of course, and what I’ve been thinking about is larger than partisan inclinations.  . . . Read More


Thank You

The sunrises have been extraordinary lately, unfortunately due to smoke that’s filtered our way from the west coast fires.  Each new morning I see another bright orange sun, I think of the people who have lost their homes, family members, and healthy air to breathe. It was shocking to read in the news yesterday that . . . Read More


The Messy Middle

A consistent presence in the kindergarten class from year to year is the hermit crab terrarium.  Hermit crabs become members of the class, providing hours of entertainment as they crawl in and out of wooden block structures constructed by five-year-olds.  What I’ve always found intriguing about hermit crabs is how they inhabit a shell, then . . . Read More


Hybrid

For many years I’ve thought of the Seed as a hybrid.  Early on, we drew on a variety of approaches to inform our practices.  In graduate school I researched Montessori, Waldorf, and embraced the Whole Language movement.  We’ve studied the constructivist approach, based on Piaget’s theory, and added Love and Logic ® to our toolbox.  . . . Read More


From the Stars

We’re now closing in on our second week of school in its new COVID-era manifestation.  I have to say I’m totally impressed with our teachers who, under incredible responsibility/stress, are making this happen for both our in-person and virtual students.  We still have refinements to make, and we are progressing.  I want to tell you . . . Read More


A Balanced Approach

We did it.  We reopened the Seed.  On Tuesday morning we were greeted by appreciative families dropping off their precious children.  Some of the kids were apprehensive about not only having their hair checked for lice as they do every first day of school, but also having their temperature taken.  Having to say goodbye to . . . Read More


Cars in the Parking Lot

 It’s been four and a half months since there were this many cars in our parking lot.  Cautiously the Seed staff has returned for a week of cleaning, planning, and preparing for what lies ahead.  We’ve completed CPR training and gone over COVID-19 protocols, in addition to preparing for virtual teaching along with in-person learning.  . . . Read More


Time to Wake Up

Normally we’d be on vacation right about now, looking at scenes such as this one on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state.  We would be revitalizing ourselves by walking beaches on either coast, perhaps taking a ferry from one location to another.  There was always a body of water involved.  Last night, as we took . . . Read More


Relationships of Healing

 The warmer weather has inspired me to find a new route for my morning walks.  Through a bit of exploring, I’ve discovered some sleepy, lesser traveled streets near South Mountain that even provide a bit of shade.  At the point where I turn around, a sailboat is parked.  It’s been there awhile, and seems like . . . Read More


I Wear My Mask for You

 Earlier this week, our board of directors had to make the difficult decision to keep the Seed closed a bit longer.  We were hoping to offer a three-week summer program, to provide much-needed childcare, as well as test our projected adaptations we plan to implement in August.  Before finalizing the summer opening date, we determined . . . Read More


Getting It Right

The branches on the Seed’s apple tree are heavily weighted with dozens of apples.  I’m certain the crop is larger than usual, due to the absence of small “harvesters” this year.  The tree is also maturing, and capable of producing more.  The apples seem symbolic of the weight upon us at this time in history, . . . Read More