A Balanced Approach

We did it.  We reopened the Seed.  On Tuesday morning we were greeted by appreciative families dropping off their precious children.  Some of the kids were apprehensive about not only having their hair checked for lice as they do every first day of school, but also having their temperature taken.  Having to say goodbye to . . . Read More


Cars in the Parking Lot

 It’s been four and a half months since there were this many cars in our parking lot.  Cautiously the Seed staff has returned for a week of cleaning, planning, and preparing for what lies ahead.  We’ve completed CPR training and gone over COVID-19 protocols, in addition to preparing for virtual teaching along with in-person learning.  . . . Read More


Love in Action

 My plan was to take a two-week break from my blog.  I did want to share one link with you that was truly inspiring, though, an interview with the late John Lewis.  His words, like his life, motivate me to keep going, to keep doing the work.  Last night’s full rainbow after the storm was . . . Read More


Time to Wake Up

Normally we’d be on vacation right about now, looking at scenes such as this one on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state.  We would be revitalizing ourselves by walking beaches on either coast, perhaps taking a ferry from one location to another.  There was always a body of water involved.  Last night, as we took . . . Read More


A Seat at the Table

 These past few weeks, as we’ve been planning for the Seed’s re-opening in August, a steady stream of podcasts and articles have filled up spare moments. I’ve been listening to a variety of voices, all devoted to one thing, making this a better world for all human beings.  As I read and listen, more and . . . Read More


Relationships of Healing

 The warmer weather has inspired me to find a new route for my morning walks.  Through a bit of exploring, I’ve discovered some sleepy, lesser traveled streets near South Mountain that even provide a bit of shade.  At the point where I turn around, a sailboat is parked.  It’s been there awhile, and seems like . . . Read More


I Wear My Mask for You

 Earlier this week, our board of directors had to make the difficult decision to keep the Seed closed a bit longer.  We were hoping to offer a three-week summer program, to provide much-needed childcare, as well as test our projected adaptations we plan to implement in August.  Before finalizing the summer opening date, we determined . . . Read More


Promoting Social Justice

One by one, each child was acknowledged and celebrated.  Beginning with our tiniest toddlers, and ending with our 3rd/4th grade graduates, the day of celebration brought a most unusual school year to an end.  Despite not being physically present with our students since early March, each teacher had kind, thoughtful words about the students with . . . Read More


Cultivating Resilience

Two weeks ago I wrote about our efforts as a staff to do what’s best for kids.  I keep thinking about this topic, and a related one—children’s mental health.  Daily I see articles about this subject, and have concerns that, amidst the focus on academic learning time lost, the mental health piece is not being addressed . . . Read More


Reading the Wind

It’s that time of year when everything at school winds down.  Teachers are writing progress reports and making awards.  Ceremonies of completion and graduation are being planned.  Teachers are organizing students’ materials to take home as a record of the past ten months.  The one big difference this year is that none of the festivities . . . Read More


What’s Best for the Kids

These past several weeks Bill has showed up at school every day (except a few Sundays) to burn weeds, trim trees, tidy up the playground, paint classrooms, and organize the sand circle area.  He sorted and washed all the spoons, bowls, and pots and pans. He’s used this time to make the space ready to . . . Read More


Tomorrow’s Yesterday

When I was a kid, May 1st was a day of connection.  We’d make little baskets and fill them with lilacs, popcorn, and candy, then deliver them to friends’ front doors.  It was a sweet way to remember close friends.  It’s not a practice we see around here.  And with social distancing in place, as . . . Read More


Live in a Good Way for Her

Earth Day has historically been one of the most important days of the year at Awakening Seed.  It’s an embodiment of the Seed’s mission statement:  “Awakening Seed is an innovative, compassionate learning community that inspires global citizens by fostering curiosity, celebrating uniqueness, and promoting social justice.”  This year, more than any other year, it was . . . Read More


We Miss

 As we enter our second month of days at home instead of the Seed,  it’s beginning to sink in that we may be at this longer than we originally anticipated.  The novelty has begun to wear off, and the list of things we are missing from our old life grows longer each day.  Granted, most . . . Read More


Caring for Our Own

A devoted mother dove sits in the nest she built on a small shelf above the hose in our back yard.  She’s been there for nearly two weeks.  There were two eggs originally, and now there is one hatchling, whose eyes are still closed.  I don’t know what happened to the other one.  This mother . . . Read More


Keeping It Whole

On Tuesday morning I was over at the Seed taking photos for our upcoming yearbook project.  Evidence of spring was everywhere.  Bill has been hard at work keeping weeds at bay, and the freshly mown grass looks incredibly healthy.  A few class gardens are bursting with produce, including kale, chard, and spinach.  Sunflowers are blooming . . . Read More


Stay Open

When I returned from my trip to Nebraska, I checked out a group of mysterious cabbage-like plants in our garden.  Looking closer, I discovered underneath the lush green leaves a whole collection of tiny Brussels sprouts.   How could this be?  I do remember planting seeds months ago, but thought our rabbit visitors had wiped . . . Read More


After the Seed

Choosing a school can be a daunting task. We see parents in this process every few weeks as they attend our introductory tours. It’s a huge decision to choose the environment where a child will spend most of his/her waking hours during the week. The early years shape a child cognitively, socially, physically, and emotionally. . . . Read More


Last Night We Were Brave

Although everyone is moving a bit slower this morning, we’re all feeling the glow of last night’s performance.  The amount of effort that goes into our winter solstice production is unseen by most of our audience.  The vision, patience, and practice that fill up our December weeks came forth last night as we offered an . . . Read More


On the Threshold of Winter

 In most places around the country falling leaves signal the arrival of autumn.  Not so in Phoenix.  When leaves at the Seed finally cover the ground, we know we’re well on our way to winter.  Even though the winter solstice is still a week away, the leaf-covered ground is a sign that our balmy days . . . Read More


December Strong

 The other night at sunset, the looming darkness took me back to where I was a year ago.  Just a few weeks shy of our departure for India, I felt like I was at the edge of a great chasm, preparing to step completely into the unknown.  The month of December with the shortest days . . . Read More


Steeped in Gratitude

Preparations for our celebration of gratitude started last week as each class brainstormed ideas of what they could for another classroom.  In the K-1 class they began with the question:  What is it to be thankful?  Children said, “It’s when you love people.”  “It’s when you say thank you for all that people do for . . . Read More


A Story Line for Each Character

Since late August, I’ve worked with the 3rd/4th graders on their writing once a week.  At the suggestion of their teacher, we jumped into a form of writing that was new to me with this age group, development of a fictional character and creating a story around that character.  In the past, I generally stuck . . . Read More


Instead of Selling Candy

The Seed carnival started in the 1980s as an alternative to trick-or-treating.  It has evolved over the years into a huge community event, attended by current and alumni families, as well as neighbors and other local friends.  It’s become a much anticipated first return to the Seed after families leave to move on to other . . . Read More