Multi Tasking

We have a small box we open only at this time of year.  It contains gaffers tape, a map, and a six foot segment of ribbon with a tiny piece of yellow chalk tied to the end.  It might seem like an odd, insignificant little collection of things, but in reality, it’s quite foundational to . . . Read More


seedfood tour

 In honor of our all-school nutrition study, this week’s blog will be a tour of our seedfood website.  The site came into being several years ago when the lead teachers gathered for a discussion about developmentally appropriate food practices.  Starting with an article on this topic, we talked about how much children should be expected . . . Read More


A Beginning with Intention

When I teach young writers, one of the first things we work on is topic selection.  We discuss how the challenge isn’t usually having something to write about, it’s deciding which of many topics to choose.  That’s how I feel about this summer.  In the six weeks since I wrote my last blog, I’ve walked . . . Read More


Ant Alert

I can’t help myself.  When I see ants, I think of PreK.   During these summer months, there is no shortage of opportunities for such sitings.  For example, I  recently spotted a colony aggressively partaking of a discarded roadside piece of pepperoni pizza.  There were easily 200 ants on the 4-bite size of pizza.   . . . Read More


Climbing Trees

I was a child who inhabited trees. The property around our neighborhood was full of mature trees that provided multiple sites for treehouses. Some were built by professionals who knew what they were doing. Others were kid-built and, thinking back, I’m surprised my parents allowed us to hang out so high off the ground in . . . Read More


Four PhD’s and a Veterinarian

It’s been a dramatic week, with the Preschool 4s presenting their version of The Great Kapok Tree.  They performed the play in celebration of their rainforest study, which is coming to an end.  It’s been inspiring to see four- and five-year-olds entering the building these past few months with their handmade posters, ready to make . . . Read More


Such A Friend

On Saturday I attended a memorial service for Dr. Joan Moyer, my first ASU professor in early childhood education.  It was 1975, and I was a recently divorced single mom finally accepting the fact that I was destined to be a teacher, like the previous four generations of women in my family.  I’d already dropped . . . Read More


Sphere of Influence

As our complex world continues on its trajectory through time and space, I’m seeing that often the best way to help is to work with what’s right in front of us. Through a conversation with one of our Seed dads, I was introduced to an article that addresses this idea. The author, Kevin McCarty, explores . . . Read More


The Last Straw

Anyone who has known me for any length of time knows I’m obsessed with plastic—reducing, reusing, and recycling it.  I bring my own reusable bags wherever I shop, spreading the message to one cashier at a time about the wastefulness of plastic bags.  More and more, I make purchasing decisions based on the amount of . . . Read More


An Earthworm Civics Lesson

Last week we received a wonderful surprise.  News arrived from the community service branch of Brady, our janitorial supply company, that the Seed had been selected as the recipient of a $2,500 Brady Shines grant to help fund our new walkway, which will enhance handicap access to our playground.  It was a reminder of the . . . Read More


Miracles of Multiage Learning

During my last seven years of teaching, I taught a multiage 4th/5th grade class.  They were some of my best and most memorable years as a teacher.  In fact, I’m still in touch with many of those students, who are now in their twenties.  Over the years, Awakening Seed has incorporated the multiage approach when . . . Read More


Creatures of the Earth and Sky

Monday in the kindergarten class was a spontaneous preview of our summer art camp.  The class has been studying Ecuador, guided by their student teacher who is from there.  As part of their study, the Galapagos Islands became a topic of discussion.  This grabbed my attention and brought back strong memories of a student who . . . Read More


Moonshadow

The last morning of January, the moon had all sorts of things going on.  It was a super moon, when the moon appears larger because it’s closer to the Earth.  Additionally, it was a blue moon because it was the second full moon in the same month.  It was also a  full lunar eclipse, sometimes . . . Read More


Talking Makes a Difference

Last week I wrote about the Seed’s commitment to continuing the conversation about race and social justice.  This week we stepped into it further.  On Wednesday morning, our dear friend, Dr. Elsie Moore, paid a visit to the Seed and left us with much to ponder.  Elsie is the director of ASU’s School of Social . . . Read More


Ofrenda

The little altar under the tree caught my eye.  I saw it on my way out to Gwen’s Castle with the 3rd/4th graders the morning after Halloween.  We were headed to the castle as part of Día de Los Muertos, Day of the Dead.  For several weeks, many classes have been learning about this time . . . Read More


Slithering Like A Snake

Occasionally ideas slither like a snake around the Seed, and we never know where they’ll end up.  Wednesday was one of those days.  Each year around Halloween, PreK students take on the study of a creature that generally creeps out humans, creatures like bats, spiders, and snakes.  Snakes are this year’s chosen species. Coincidentally, the . . . Read More


D N

Our Seed writers are on fire.  It’s a rebirth of the writer’s workshops that were prevalent at the Seed in the 80s and 90s.  Although there have been threads of writing throughout the school’s history, we wanted to re-establish the depth and volume of the past.  So every Wednesday of our summer program we met . . . Read More


An Exhale of Color

The first days of autumn in Phoenix often feel more symbolic than actual.  As friends in other parts of the country start pulling out their sweaters and long pants, we’re celebrating the occasional day when temperatures dip into double digits.  Even so, there are other signs that the season is changing.  Sunflowers that have withstood . . . Read More


Project Approach, Phase Two

In case you thought Wednesday was a bad diaper day for the toddlers, you can be rest assured, it was merely the PreK’s batch of brussels sprouts baking in the oven.   We take our nutrition study seriously and that means stepping out of our comfort zone from time to time to try new tastes . . . Read More


Project Approach, Phase One

Often a study begins with a question.  “Where does hummus come from?”  “What does candy do for your body?” “How can we turn into food detectives?”  Questions like these are surfacing around the Seed as we prepare to embark on our annual school-wide nutrition study.  We’ve had many successful studies in the past and expect . . . Read More


Totality

Just when our planet needed a positive distraction, nature provided.  Monday’s eclipse lived up to the hype, even at the Seed.  Initially, we made an executive decision to keep our students indoors to protect their young eyes.  We made plans for older classes to watch live stream coverage of the eclipse and some classes began . . . Read More


Clearing the Way

Seed teachers are back at it.  We started our prep week on Tuesday and it’s been an action packed few days.  Currently the hallway is lined with items each teacher no longer needs, including extra random art supplies, puzzles with missing pieces, wrong sized tables or shelves, lost and found clothing, and outdated equipment.  My . . . Read More


Hot Lava with My Eyes

This morning a kindergartener bounced into school with a book and long strip of police badge stickers in her hands.  I asked what she was carrying and she said it was a book to share about her mom, who is a police officer.  I said, “That’s right.  Your mom is a super hero for sure!”  . . . Read More


Sharing Space

Action figures arrived from home in sets of five.  As the week unfolded, those same figures brought acceptance and respect alive in a whole new way.  Over the weekend their teacher cleared enough cubicles for each child to have a personal space.  Before long, the classroom looked like a colony of condos.  Toys, blocks, and . . . Read More