Thank You

The sunrises have been extraordinary lately, unfortunately due to smoke that’s filtered our way from the west coast fires.  Each new morning I see another bright orange sun, I think of the people who have lost their homes, family members, and healthy air to breathe. It was shocking to read in the news yesterday that . . . Read More


I Wear My Mask for You

 Earlier this week, our board of directors had to make the difficult decision to keep the Seed closed a bit longer.  We were hoping to offer a three-week summer program, to provide much-needed childcare, as well as test our projected adaptations we plan to implement in August.  Before finalizing the summer opening date, we determined . . . Read More


After the Seed

Choosing a school can be a daunting task. We see parents in this process every few weeks as they attend our introductory tours. It’s a huge decision to choose the environment where a child will spend most of his/her waking hours during the week. The early years shape a child cognitively, socially, physically, and emotionally. . . . Read More


On Fire

A few days ago I read a plea for help posted on Facebook by one of our Seed alums. She’s living in Australia.  Her post included a stunning photo of a huge plume of smoke and an article describing the fire as big as Manhattan.  I thought about her post all weekend and decided we . . . Read More


Instead of Selling Candy

The Seed carnival started in the 1980s as an alternative to trick-or-treating.  It has evolved over the years into a huge community event, attended by current and alumni families, as well as neighbors and other local friends.  It’s become a much anticipated first return to the Seed after families leave to move on to other . . . Read More


Saving Seeds

Harvesting seeds is no easy task, especially for three-year-old fingers. In case you’re unfamiliar with kale, broccoli, cauliflower, and cilantro seeds, they’re about the size of a small pin head. They mostly grow in long thin pods that only crack open easily when they are dry. There’s a purpose behind the tediousness of harvesting tiny . . . Read More


Teamwork for a Cause

Last week I described potential plans and activities happening on and around Earth Day at the Seed.  One project in particular took on a life of its own.  The Preschool 4s’ campaign to help the African Wildlife Foundation has become a school-wide effort, thanks to the generosity of parents, as well as their baking talents.  . . . Read More


Activists Every Day

We’re doing Earth Day differently this year.  Usually we pick one issue—such as plastic bags, throwaway straws, or endangered species—and make it a whole school theme.  We decide how to address the issue within each classroom, then report back to the whole group on Earth Day.  This year, since such varied authentic learning is happening . . . Read More


Air Inequality

Since returning from India, I’ve thought about air quality.  A lot.  It was one part of the trip for which I was unprepared.  I managed to escape the common digestive tract illness most people contract while traveling, but ended up coming home with a nasty case of bronchitis.  As a result, I’ve appreciated the clean . . . Read More


Pile of Temptation

You may have noticed the collection of stars posted on our office bulletin board.  Beneath the stars is a growing pile of toys, pillows, basketballs, and children’s pajamas.  Tucked under the table is a brand new child’s bike.  So many gifts are arriving that we’ve opened up an additional table space to hold the incoming . . . Read More


Gratitude in the Air

In the past few days I’ve noticed people mingling outside the 3rd/4th grade classroom.  Finally I walked down the hallway to check out what was going on.  The class created a giant bingo display with an act of kindness in each section.  Anyone interested in participating is invited to sign their name in a section . . . Read More


Hanging Out with the Monsters

When the carnival starts next Friday night, you won’t see me right away.  I’ll be hanging out backstage with the monsters.  You see, for the past 31 years, I’ve been one of the Mystery Theater players.  We’re a dedicated band of hooligans (also Seed staff members) who enjoy making people laugh.   The Mystery Theater . . . Read More


It’s Carnival Season

There are few traditions as well established as our annual Halloween carnival.  It’s a labor of love by many people in our Seed village, and it happens close to the beginning of the new school year.  For new families, it can seem like information overload.  I’m writing this to highlight a few components of the . . . Read More


May We Be

On Saturday we held the annual retreat for our Seed board of directors.  I don’t often write about the board, since our work is primarily behind the scenes.  The board is a guardian of the Seed, looking out for everything from the annual budget to the school’s long range vision.  Primarily Seed parents, either current or . . . Read More


Seed Sale

It was a plane that derailed my plans for this week’s blog.  I fully intended to describe the many wonderful food experiences happening around the Seed as part of our school-wide nutrition study.  I was going to write about the incredible smells, the scent of pizza, beans, and pesto that permeated the hallway.  I aimed . . . Read More


Holding Space

 Forty-one years ago I signed on to bring forth a school, which has now become Awakening Seed.  I was 25 years old at the time, just barely an adult.  I made the commitment because I knew it was the right thing to do.  I had two young daughters then, and I wanted them to have . . . Read More


The Last Straw

Anyone who has known me for any length of time knows I’m obsessed with plastic—reducing, reusing, and recycling it.  I bring my own reusable bags wherever I shop, spreading the message to one cashier at a time about the wastefulness of plastic bags.  More and more, I make purchasing decisions based on the amount of . . . Read More


An Honest Week’s Work

The Seed was infested with ants when we returned from spring break.  Not the kind of ants the PreK class is studying, human ants.  During our week off, Bill ordered fourteen tons of sand to be delivered.  The pile loomed by the swings and sand circle, inviting possibility.  Mobilization of the work force was in . . . Read More


Lucky to Be Alive Right Now

Like some of my colleagues and friends, I had the good fortune of seeing Hamilton last week.  It was like nothing I’ve ever experienced.  Everything about it was exceptional, and as I continue listening to its soundtrack, more is revealed.  Several major themes keep circling around in my mind, including standing up for what you . . . Read More


Upgrading the Shed

There was a time when we had chickens.  One of our talented dads built a coop for them, including the enclosure that, in recent history, has become the maintenance storage area.  The chickens have been long gone, for a variety of reasons, and the coop remained, filled with all sorts of things not suitable for . . . Read More


Inspiration for All

It’s not my regular practice to write about individuals.  I prefer to write about our Seed community, about the relationships and dynamics that keep the school a vital, living entity.  Nevertheless, from time to time, a specific person catches my attention.  When you hear her story, I think you’ll understand why this week’s blog is . . . Read More


A Pile of Rocks

Years ago, while visiting a friend near Concord, Massachusetts, we took a day trip to Walden Pond.  I’ve been a fan of Thoreau since my teens, so standing in the space where he spent his two years, two months, and two days at Walden Pond was significant.  That day I soaked in the essence of . . . Read More


Hot Lava with My Eyes

This morning a kindergartener bounced into school with a book and long strip of police badge stickers in her hands.  I asked what she was carrying and she said it was a book to share about her mom, who is a police officer.  I said, “That’s right.  Your mom is a super hero for sure!”  . . . Read More


How I Feel in Arizona’s Summer Heat

In keeping with the Seed’s emergent curriculum model, our week of learning about feelings is gathering inspiration from the heat wave.  The first and second graders used the high temperatures to launch a project called, “How I Feel In Arizona’s Summer Heat.”  Their visual images certainly express how many of us feel these days, especially . . . Read More