The Last Straw

Anyone who has known me for any length of time knows I’m obsessed with plastic—reducing, reusing, and recycling it.  I bring my own reusable bags wherever I shop, spreading the message to one cashier at a time about the wastefulness of plastic bags.  More and more, I make purchasing decisions based on the amount of . . . Read More


An Honest Week’s Work

The Seed was infested with ants when we returned from spring break.  Not the kind of ants the PreK class is studying, human ants.  During our week off, Bill ordered fourteen tons of sand to be delivered.  The pile loomed by the swings and sand circle, inviting possibility.  Mobilization of the work force was in . . . Read More


Lucky to Be Alive Right Now

Like some of my colleagues and friends, I had the good fortune of seeing Hamilton last week.  It was like nothing I’ve ever experienced.  Everything about it was exceptional, and as I continue listening to its soundtrack, more is revealed.  Several major themes keep circling around in my mind, including standing up for what you . . . Read More


Upgrading the Shed

There was a time when we had chickens.  One of our talented dads built a coop for them, including the enclosure that, in recent history, has become the maintenance storage area.  The chickens have been long gone, for a variety of reasons, and the coop remained, filled with all sorts of things not suitable for . . . Read More


Inspiration for All

It’s not my regular practice to write about individuals.  I prefer to write about our Seed community, about the relationships and dynamics that keep the school a vital, living entity.  Nevertheless, from time to time, a specific person catches my attention.  When you hear her story, I think you’ll understand why this week’s blog is . . . Read More


A Pile of Rocks

Years ago, while visiting a friend near Concord, Massachusetts, we took a day trip to Walden Pond.  I’ve been a fan of Thoreau since my teens, so standing in the space where he spent his two years, two months, and two days at Walden Pond was significant.  That day I soaked in the essence of . . . Read More


Hot Lava with My Eyes

This morning a kindergartener bounced into school with a book and long strip of police badge stickers in her hands.  I asked what she was carrying and she said it was a book to share about her mom, who is a police officer.  I said, “That’s right.  Your mom is a super hero for sure!”  . . . Read More


How I Feel in Arizona’s Summer Heat

In keeping with the Seed’s emergent curriculum model, our week of learning about feelings is gathering inspiration from the heat wave.  The first and second graders used the high temperatures to launch a project called, “How I Feel In Arizona’s Summer Heat.”  Their visual images certainly express how many of us feel these days, especially . . . Read More


Wise Words

Each week I aim for 500 words and generally, I’m in the ballpark.  This week is an exception and as you read on, you’ll see why.  Even though this week’s is longer, I hope you’ll stay with me because it’s about our three speakers at the Seed’s 40th birthday celebration.  We selected three inividuals to cover significant focus . . . Read More


Sweet Lesson in Service

Halloween is a sweet time of year, and I’m not talking candy.  Certainly it’s sweet when the temperatures fall below 100, even if it’s just barely in double digits.  It’s fun to hear the kids talk excitedly about their Halloween costumes and what they plan to do at the carnival.  As I wrote last week, . . . Read More


Big Kids at the Seed

These days, when everyone is deciding about next year, our older students have been on my mind. The elementary years at the Seed are optional in many respects, with a variety of free alternatives available once children reach kindergarten age. Over the years I’ve learned not to take family decisions personally, trusting that the same . . . Read More